Malaria - When Art Meets Science

 

Scales on a mosquito leg (Anopheles stephensi)



Scales on a mosquito leg (Anopheles stephensi)

Scanning Electron Micrograph of a mosquito leg (Anopheles stephensi) clearly showing individual scales. Anopheles stephensi is one of the major vectors of urban malaria in India and some parts of Asia. Malaria is caused by parasites (Plasmodium species) which enter the blood when infected mosquitoes feed. Anopheles stephensi is commonly used in research as it can be easily reared and maintained in the laboratory. False-coloured scanning electron micrograph; x 400; width of one scale is approximately 12 micrometers.

B0008763 Credit Lauren Holden, Wellcome Images



Cinchonine crystals


Cinchonine crystals

Light micrograph of cinchonine crystals. Cinchonine is a natural compound found in the bark of the Cinchona tree. Cinchonine together with quinine and other alkaloids found in Cinchona bark have been used historically to treat malaria. It may also have anti-inflammatory properties and play a role in suppressing formation of adipocytes (cells which store excess energy as fat) so is being studied further as a potential anti-obesity drug. Horizontal width of image is 1.3 mm.

B0009584Credit Spike Walker, Wellcome Images



Cinchonine crystals


Cinchonine crystals

Polarised light micrograph using Rheinberg illumination of cinchonine crystals. Cinchonine is a natural compound found in the bark of the Cinchona tree. Cinchonine together with quinine and other alkaloids found in Cinchona bark have been used historically to treat malaria. It may also have anti-inflammatory properties and play a role in suppressing formation of adipocytes (cells which store excess energy as fat) so is being studied further as a potential anti-obesity drug. Horizontal width of image is 1.2 mm

B0009585 Credit Spike Walker, Wellcome Images




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